After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East

Lecture / book discussion

“After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East”

Brian T. Edwards

11659535_10153446641277743_6472254266402589927_n

Monday, Dec. 7th

6:15 p.m.

ALIF Annex auditorium

22 Rue Mohamed Diouri, Ville Nouvelle

(next to ALC/ALIF)

When Henry Luce announced in 1941 that we were living in the “American century,” he believed that the international popularity of American culture made the world favorable to U.S. interests. Now, in the digital twenty-first century, the American century has been superseded, as American movies, music, video games, and television shows are received, understood, and transformed. How do we make sense of this shift? Building on a decade of fieldwork in Cairo, Casablanca, and Tehran, Brian T. Edwards maps new routes of cultural exchange that are innovative, accelerated, and full of diversions. Shaped by the digital revolution, these paths are entwined with the growing fragility of American “soft” power. They indicate an era after the American century, in which popular American products and phenomena–such as comic books, teen romances, social-networking sites, and ways of expressing sexuality–are stripped of their associations with the United States and recast in very different forms.

Arguing against those who talk about a world in which American culture is merely replicated or appropriated, Edwards focuses on creative moments of uptake, in which Arabs and Iranians make something unexpected. He argues that these products do more than extend the reach of the original. They reflect a world in which culture endlessly circulates and gathers new meanings.

ABOUT THE LECTURER / AUTHOR

Brian T. Edwards is Crown Professor in Middle East Studies and professor of English and comparative literary studies at Northwestern University, where he is also the founding director of the Program in Middle East and North African Studies. He is the author of Morocco Bound: Disorienting America’s Maghreb, from Casablanca to the Marrakech Express and a coeditor of Globalizing American Studies. His articles have been published in the Believer, Public Culture, the Chicago Tribune, and elsewhere.

This lecture is open to the general public

Presentation of a New Book: The Last Civilized Place

“The Last Civilized Place: Sijilmasa and Its Saharan Destiny”
a lecture and book presentation by Ronald Messier & James Miller

Monday, Oct. 26 at 6 PM at the ALC/ALIF Annex Auditorium
22 Rue Mohamed Diouri, Fes V.N.

12033061_992532774138044_6157460841834835634_n

Many people know the word, “Sijilmasa,” and regard its existence as merely legendary. What was the reality of Sijilmasa, perhaps the most important forgotten place in Moroccan history? Between 1988 and 1998, the Moroccan-American Project at Sijilmasa (MAPS) explored the site of ancient Sijilmasa using methods drawn from archaeology, history, geography, and remote sensing to begin to weave together a picture of the ancient city and its place in Moroccan and African history. Now, with the publication of their new book, the organizers of MAPS will present some of the challenges they faced and discoveries they made at the site of the ancient city.

Open to the general public…please join us!

The Arab Spring: Moroccan Exceptionalism?

ALIF Lecture Series
Presents
==========
“The Arab Spring: Moroccan Exceptionalism?”
A lecture by
Sadik Rddad

sadiq

Wednesday, September 30th
6:15 p.m.
ALIF Annex Auditorium
22 Rue Mohamed Diouri, Ville Nouvelle

The lecture examines the Arab Spring with particular focus on the Moroccan experience through February 20th Movement. It addresses the role of youth, women, Islamist groups and leftist parties in shaping Constitutional changes and Moroccan exceptionalism.
This lecture is open to the general public

Ramadan Customs in Morocco

“Ramadan Customs in Morocco”
a lecture by Mostapha El Ouajjani

Wednesday, June 17 at 6:15 PM
ALC-ALIF Annex Auditorium, 22 Rue Mohammed Diouri

11401385_926621040729218_574226972507206790_n

How do Moroccans observe the holy month of Ramadan? What does this month mean for them? What are its religious and social implications? How does it affect the daily routine of the society? What is the Ramadan etiquette? What code of conduct is expected of non-Muslims during this month? These are some of the issues that this lecture will attempt to address.

This lecture is open to the general public.

“Multi-party System and Political Parties in Morocco”

ALIF Lecture Series presents

“Multi-party System and Political Parties in Morocco”

A lecture by

Sadik Rddad

sadiq

Thursday, March 12
6:15 p.m.
ALIF Annex auditorium
22 Rue Mohamed Diouri, Ville Nouvelle
(next to ALC/ALIF)

This lecture discusses the rise and evolution of political parties in Morocco starting from the mid 40’s of the 20th Century. It addresses the political, cultural, and social tensions between the liberal, modernist, and secular ideologies of the Left and the conservative ideology of the Right parties. It also analyses the major political phases in Morocco related to State building, struggle for power and conflict between the Istiqlal party and the Monarchy Institution, the process of Democratization and Consensus, and the implications of the rise of the Islamist Party (Development and Justice Party).

This lecture is open to the general public

Blindness and Dreams

A lecture and discussion by Megumi Matsubara and Kenneth Brown
Saturday, Feb. 28, 4:30-6:30 PM
Auditorium of the ALC-ALIF Annex, 22 Rue Mohammed Diouri, Fes Ville Nouvelle

11027776_10203528196073149_2120529444009317362_n

What do you see when you close your eyes? How far can your eyes see? And what about when you dream?
The American Language Center & Arabic Language Institute in Fez is pleased to organize a joint presentation by artist Megumi Matsubara and scholar Kenneth Brown, who will speak about their understanding of blindness and dreams. Sharing the itineraries of their practice and research in Morocco and within Islamic cultures, they will consider the relation between memory and internal vision. Drawing upon poetry, imagery and history, they will also touch upon the worlds of Taha Husayn, Najib Mahfouz, Jorge Luis Borges, Junichiro Tanizaki or Henry Corbin within such themes.

Open to the general public.

Geometry and Decorative Art in Morocco

ALIF lecture series
Presents

Geometry and Decorative Art in Morocco
A lecture by Richard Allen
St. Olaf College

AllenRichard

Two-dimensional Islamic art is decorative and based on plane geometry. This presentation will start with images from the three forms – geometric forms, floral arabesque, calligraphy – and then focus on how the geometric forms can be organized into three underlying categories based respectively on octagons, hexagons, and pentagons.

moroccan-mosaic-16815638

Thursday, January 22nd

6:15 p.m.

Annex auditorium

22 Rue Mohamed Diouri, Ville Nouvelle

This lecture is open to the general public

The Arab Spring: Moroccan Exceptionalism?

ALIF Lecture Series
Presents
==========
“The Arab Spring: Moroccan Exceptionalism?”
A lecture by
Sadik Rddad

sadiq

Tuesday, October 14th
6:15 p.m.
ALIF Annex Auditorium
22 Rue Mohamed Diouri, Ville Nouvelle

The lecture examines the Arab Spring with particular focus on the Moroccan experience through February 20th Movement. It addresses the role of youth, women, Islamist groups and leftist parties in shaping Constitutional changes and Moroccan exceptionalism.
This lecture is open to the general public

The Hammam as Tangible and Intangible Cultural Heritage in Morocco

ALIF lecture series

Presents

==========

 ““The Hammam as Tangible and Intangible

Cultural Heritage in Morocco”

A lecture by

Naima Lahbil

Naima-lahbil2

Naima Lahbil, Moroccan Professor of Economics and current consultant with ADER-FES on the HAMMAMEED project will talk about the importance of the Hammam in Moroccan everyday culture and experience. Professor Lahbil has long been a champion of the cultural and historic heritage of Fes Medina and worked with UNESCO and the World Bank on many projects.

The project is working on restoring and maintaining the architectural and historic integrity of some of the important hammams in the medina. This lecture will give students some insight into the Moroccan hammam experience as well as an opportunity to learn more about the direction and goals of the historic restoration projects in Fes

Thursday, Sep. 18th
6:20 p.m.
Annex auditorium

This lecture is open to the general public