English Teaching Internship Initiative – ETII at ALC Fes

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30 wonderful ETII participants

The English Teaching Internship Initiative (ETII) began as an offshoot of the ALC’s Community Service Club (CSC). ALC volunteers were giving weekly English classes to students at a handicrafts center in Fez. However, with too many students and too few volunteers, the ALC’s CSC couldn’t keep up. Hence the idea was born to meet this need by bringing in Moroccan English Master’s students from the local university to supplement the work of the ALC volunteers. This proved to be a win-win for everyone involved: all the handicraft students were assured free weekly English lessons, and the Master’s students (many hoping to be English teachers one day) benefited from this unique professional development experience.

Now, thanks to a generous grant from the US State Department, the ETII is able to build on its success by expanding the scope of its mission to reach more beneficiaries around Fez. Thanks to an official partnership with the the Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdullah University (SMBAU), the ETII is assured the full support of the higher education leadership in Fez. Furthermore, the ALC Fez has graciously offered its financial, logistical, and pedagogical backing to the ETII. Lastly, in order to reach students across Fez, the ETII has partnered with diverse Moroccan ministries, associations, and schools with the aim of expanding English language education in Fes. Source: http://etii.co/

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The amazing team of ALC teacher trainers, Taoufik, Kim, Safae, Chakib and ETII founder Peter.

English Teaching Internship Initiative-ETII- is a great opportunity for MA and Phd students to embrace the world of teaching and improve their English teaching skills. Through the program, students will go set up English language programs at ‘alternative education centers’ for underprivileged young Moroccans who live in precarious familial, economic, and/or social situations. This free program aims at boosting the academic excellence of students and making a difference in the lives of underprivileged Moroccans.

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The famous Rachida Guelzim in one of ETII workshops

Ouiam Mallouk, one of the beneficiaries of the ETII Program states: ”Teaching has always been my passion since I have been raised in a family where all my sisters are language teachers. I am really happy to be part of the ETII program at ALC Fes. It is indeed a valuable learning experience for students. The ETII organizing team did a great job by bringing professionals and experts in the field of teaching. I am impressed of how enthusiastic teachers are while sharing their knowledge and expertise with us during the intensive weekend workshops. They really encouraged me to love teaching more. The workshops include different teaching methods ranging from Communicative, Structural, Grammar Translation, and Total Physical Response. I really liked the focus on interaction in teaching. I consider it as an effective way that teachers use to keep students interested and focused. I find the weekly in-class instruction interesting since it is both a learning and practical activity. I get the chance to observe and shadow how the instructor teaches and what methods/activities he uses. The program will allow me to take the TKT test- Teaching Knowledge Test which is an internationally recognized teaching certificate. This certificate will open new doors for me and prepare me for a future professional life as a young educator of English in my country Morocco and even abroad.”

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Ouiam Mallouk, one of ETII participants.

Check out the ETII Teaser video to get an idea about the important work the ETII team is doing to expand English education in Fez. (Click to watch the video)

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To learn more about the ETII, check our website and Facebook page.

ALC ALIF Book Club Meeting on Saturday

ALC-ALIF Book Club: Saturday, 15 Oct. at 1 PM in Room 1

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This Saturday, We will be reading a short story by Anton Chekhov, “The Bet.” Join us for an exciting discussion about this remarkable story about the meaning of life, and about whether the death penalty is right or wrong. We will also watch a video that brings the short story to life! Here is the link for the story:http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/Bet.shtml

English Lunch Is Back

English Lunch is BACK
Join us in English Lunch on Wednesday, October 12th at 12:15 PM.
Open to ALC/ALIF students and the general public.
Please sign up on the whiteboard in the ALC/ALIF garden or confirm your attendance on our Facebook page or just call or text
Ali Gala 0667741520
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ALC Fes Scholarship Winners

Congratulations to ALC FEZ SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS!

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The following students have been awarded scholarships to study at the ALC:

MERYEM EL YOUBI
KARIMA MAJID
KAOUTAR EL MESRAR
HAJAR EL YOUBI
ILHAM EL BOUBEKRI
MALIKA LAHLIBI
DOUNIA EL GHINAOUI
OUMAIMA EL BIYASH
WAFAE KARYANI
NISSRINE FARHAT
JIHAD ABSOUS
FADOUA KANDIL
CHAIMAE BRIOUEL
ZAKARIA JEDIDI
SOUMIA EDDIB
OTHMANE MOUFID

 

Fez: A City of Wonders! ALC Fes Student Voice

Fez: A City of Wonders by Nada Drissi El Bougaidi in Intermediate 1

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Known as Morocco’s cultural and historical capital, Fez is a city of treasures and a mixture of old and new.
Famous throughout almost the whole world, Fez is known for its beautiful historic monuments and its traditional industries. It’s therefore not surprising to find some of the finest museums in Morocco right here in Fez. Fez is a recommended place to visit during a trip to Morocco.
The smells, the beauty, the confusion, and the colors are all around as you seem to stumble from narrow alley to narrow alley in the souks. Don’t hesitate to get lost in the Old Medina at any time of the day. You’ll discover unexpected places, and in the end, you’ll be amazed and delighted to see how beautiful this spiritual city is.
This intellectual city has many ancient buildings as well, such as the Nejjarine Museum of Wooden Arts and Crafts, which is a fascinating museum, and Al-Quarawiyyin University, which has been named the oldest university in the world, so it’s definitely worth a visit. And also, if you come to Fez, visit a traditional hammam. It’s a truly refreshing experience.
Furthermore, Moroccan cuisine is considered to be one of the greatest cuisines on the planet, and Fez has retained the prestige of Moroccan cooking for special occasions, so don’t leave Fez without trying tagine and b’stilla.
Moreover, Faissis are so kind, generous, and open-minded. You can find in this breathtaking city many people who live together peacefully and happily.
And, besides all these things, the modern part of Fez, also called the New City, is of no great interest to tourists. This part of the city looks like any conventional city with its large shopping malls, but, in reality, the hotels in The New City are cheaper than those situated in the Old Medina. Fortunately, there will be a call to prayer five times a day from the hundreds of mosques. At first, I’m sure you will find it weird, but soon, you will think how great it is to have a reminder of God five times a day, no matter what your religion is.
Finally, there isn’t too much traffic, even though Fez is the second-largest city in Morocco. The Old Medina can only be traversed on foot. Vehicles are prohibited, and only donkeys and handcarts are used to transport goods. It’s better for the environment, too!
In conclusion, my city is a place full of history and life. So, come to explore our lifestyle, attractions, and many other things. Surely, you won’t be disappointed.

Click here to read the rest of the edition of Student Voice September 2016

ALC Fes Merit Scholars for September 2016

Scholarship Awards

The following students have been chosen as ALC-Fez Merit Scholars based on their outstanding academic performance for the past several terms. They will receive a 100% reduction in tuition fees for one term.

Beginning 2     Widad Bouchareb

Beginning 3     Salma Radi

Beginning 4     Rim Debbagh

Beginning 5     Soukayna Dkhissi

Beginning 6     Youssef Sallas

Beginning 7     Hiba Lamhashen

Intermediate 1 Imane El-Hamdouny

Intermediate 2 Maissae Beniken

Intermediate 3 Yassine Tazi

Intermediate 4 Othmane Fettah

Intermediate 5 Fatima Zohra Lissane El Haq

Intermediate 6 Idriss Basim Alami

Advanced 1     Zineb Chebihi Hassani

Advanced 2     Soukaina Allaoui

Advanced 3     Ali Alami Merrouni

Advanced 4     Hamza Samouh

Advanced 5     Kenza Kheldouni

ALC ALIF Book Club Meeting this Saturday

Book Club: Saturday, July 16 at 1 PM in Room 1

This Saturday we’ll read an article from this week’s New Yorker by George Saunders, a short-story writer whose stories, including “The Semplica Girls Diaries”, “The 400-pound CEO”, and “Al Roosten”, we’ve read in the book club. Saunders is a keen observer of everyday people, and his stories are often about people under pressures and constraints, either financial, emotional, mental, or physical. This gives Saunders a unique perspective on the kinds of people who support Donald Trump. It’s worth a read.

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ALC Fes Merit Scholars for June 2016

Scholarship Awards

The following students have been chosen as ALC-Fez Merit Scholars based on their outstanding academic performance for the past several terms. They will receive a 100% reduction in tuition fees for one term.

Beg 2 Laila El Youssfi
Beg 3 Ilhame Kermach
Beg 4 Youssra Alami Aroussi 
Beg 5 Tariq Azzouzi
Beg 6 Hamza Zoulgami
Beg 7 Safae Boutahar
Int 1 Fatine Kabbaj
Int 2 Abdelali Sbai
Int 3 Youssef Lachqar
Int 4 Asmae Jamlaoui
Int 5 Omar Mejbar
Int 6 Zineb Atimi
Adv 1 Nihal Lagrioui
Adv 2 Hiba Zine
Adv 3 Hiba Lamrani
Adv 4 Yassine Ben Ramdane
Adv 5 Omar Tijari

The Path Not Taken! ALC Fes Student Voice

May June second draft

The Path Not Taken by Chaimae Sbia in Advanced 2

I had known James since I was in middle school. I had always felt bad for him. I had always advised him and wanted him to be as hardworking as myself.

In high school, everyone had dreams, except him. He said he wasn’t sure, and that he didn’t know what he really wanted to do. I kept trying to convince him to set a goal just like everyone else, but all he did was criticize me for having a dream that my parents had set for me. I never understood why he thought it was a bad thing. I was hardworking, and I could achieve my dream, which was to become a well-known doctor with a bright future. Almost all of my classmates had dreamed about that. It wasn’t about what you wanted to do; it was about working hard for everything.

I went to medical school, so I lost touch with James, and I barely had time to visit my family. However, I wasn’t that good compared to the others. I was sure that I was working harder than the others, even though I was suffering, disgusted by surgeries and images we saw in books. To be honest, I didn’t love walking down that path, and I was very uncomfortable, but seeing how much money doctors made encouraged me and inspired me. I ended up becoming a doctor. After all the bloody years I spent studying and experiencing, I had finally become a doctor. I had been told that if I didn’t get many patients in the first two years, I would never succeed in this career. They said it was a sign.

Three years passed, and I hadn’t gotten half the number of patients that the others had gotten in one year. I had no time to waste. I went straight to my classmates from medical school and asked them how they had become successful. They all gave the same answer. They all said that they felt comfortable doing their jobs, which gave their patients a very good first impression of them. I asked again and again. I begged them to say that it wasn’t about feelings. It would have been perfect if it was about hard work, but that wasn’t the case.

I had to pull myself together. I searched everywhere for career tests. I was convinced that I should start from scratch. All the test results claimed that lawyer was the perfect job for me. I didn’t hesitate to enter law school because I always felt that I had to follow my instincts. I had always liked debates, and I had great verbal abilities.

I finally felt at ease when I started studying law. It was amazing. I should have majored in law in the first place, but I had been hoping that I could make more money as a doctor. I didn’t care about what I loved to do. It didn’t last long, compared to how many years I studied in medical school.

I became a lawyer, and I was at least six years older than my new colleagues at the law firm. I talked to everyone, and one of my co-workers told me that there was a meeting. I silently followed his footsteps. We waited for the boss to arrive. As soon as I saw him, I stood up. It was James.

James had only discovered his dream during the last summer of high school. He became successful as soon as he entered the field because he truly loved what he did. And here I was, regretting every instance when I had showed off in front of him.

Click here to read the rest of the edition of Student Voice May June 2016